Moving Companies - Moving Servicesers by PAmovers.com
ServiceMagic, Inc.

Moving Resources Everything you must know before you Move

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration's (FMCSA) regulations protect consumers on interstate moves and define the rights and responsibilities of consumers and household goods carriers.

The household goods carrier (mover) gave you this booklet to provide information about your rights and responsibilities as an individual shipper of household goods. Your primary responsibility is to select a reputable household goods carrier, ensure that you understand the terms and conditions of the contract, and understand and pursue the remedies that are available to you in case problems arise. You should talk to your mover if you have further questions. The mover will also furnish you with additional written information describing its procedure for handling your questions and complaints. The additional written information will include a telephone number you can call to obtain additional information about your move.

WHAT ARE THE MOST IMPORTANT POINTS I SHOULD REMEMBER FROM THIS PAMPHLET?

  1. Moving Companies must give written estimates.
  2. Moving Companies may give binding estimates.
  3. Non-binding estimates are not always accurate; actual charges may exceed the estimate.
  4. If your mover provides you (or someone representing you) with any partially complete document for your signature, you should verify the document is as complete as possible before signing it. Make sure the document contains all relevant shipping information, except the actual shipment weight and any other information necessary to determine the final charges for all services performed.
  5. You may request from your mover the availability of guaranteed pickup and delivery dates.
  6. Be sure you understand the mover's responsibility for loss or damage, and request an explanation of the difference between valuation and actual insurance.
  7. You have the right to be present each time your shipment is weighed.
  8. You may request a reweigh of your shipment.
  9. If you agree to move under a non-binding estimate, you should confirm with your mover - in writing - the method of payment at delivery as cash, certified check, cashier's check, money order, or credit card.
  10. Moving Companies must offer a dispute settlement program as an alternative means of settling loss or damage claims. ASK YOUR MOVER FOR DETAILS.
  11. You should ask the person you speak to whether he or she works for the actual mover or a household goods broker. A household goods broker only arranges for the transportation. A household goods broker must not represent itself as a mover. A household goods broker does not own trucks of its own. The broker is required to find an authorized mover to provide the transportation. You should know that a household goods broker generally has no authority to provide you an estimate on behalf of a specific mover. If a household goods broker provides you an estimate, it may not be binding on the actual mover and you may have to pay the actual charges the mover incurs. A household goods broker is not responsible for loss or damage.
  12. You may request complaint information about Moving Companies from the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration under the Freedom of Information Act. You may be assessed a fee to obtain this information. See 49 CFR Part 7 for the schedule of fees.
  13. You should seek estimates from at least three different Moving Companies. You should not disclose any information to the different Moving Companies about their competitors, as it may affect the accuracy of their estimates.

STORAGE-IN-TRANSIT (SIT) - The temporary warehouse storage of your shipment pending further transportation, with or without notification to you. If you (or someone representing you) cannot accept delivery on the agreed-upon date or within the agreed-upon time period (for example, because your home is not quite ready to occupy), your mover may place your shipment into SIT without notifying you. In those circumstances, you will be responsible for the added charges for SIT service, as well as the warehouse handling and final delivery charges.

However, your mover also may place your shipment into SIT if your mover was able to make delivery before the agreed-upon date (or before the first day of the agreed-upon delivery period), but you did not concur with early delivery. In those circumstances, your mover must notify you immediately of the SIT, and your mover is fully responsible for redelivery charges, handling charges, and storage charges.

SURFACE TRANSPORTATION BOARD - An agency within the U.S. Department of Transportation that regulates household goods carrier tariffs, among other responsibilities. The Surface Transportation Board's address is 1925 K Street NW., Washington, DC 20423-0001 Tele. 202-565-1674.

TARIFF - An issuance (in whole or in part) containing rates, rules, regulations, classifications, or other provisions. The Surface Transportation Board requires that a tariff contain three specific items. First, an accurate description of the services the mover offers to the public. Second, the specific applicable rates (or the basis for calculating the specific applicable rates) and service terms for services offered to the public. Third, the mover's tariff must be arranged in a way that allows you to determine the exact rate(s) and service terms applicable to your shipment.

How must my mover handle complaints and inquiries?

All Moving Companies are expected to respond promptly to complaints or inquiries from you, the customer. Should you have a complaint or question about your move, you should first attempt to obtain a satisfactory response from the mover's local agent, the sales representative who handled the arrangements for your move, or the driver assigned to your shipment.

If for any reason you are unable to obtain a satisfactory response from one of these persons, you should then contact the mover's principal office. When you make such a call, be sure to have available your copies of all documents relating to your move. Particularly important is the number assigned to your shipment by your mover.

Interstate Moving Companies are also required to offer neutral arbitration as a means of resolving consumer loss or damage disputes involving loss of or damage to household goods. Your mover is required to provide you with information regarding its arbitration program. You have the right to pursue court action under 49 U.S.C. 14706 to seek judicial redress directly rather than participate in your mover's arbitration program.

All interstate moving companies are required to maintain a complaint and inquiry procedure to assist their customers. At the time you make the arrangements for your move, you should ask the mover's representative for a description of the mover's procedure, the telephone number to be used to contact the mover, and whether the mover will pay for such telephone calls. Your mover's procedure must include the following four things:

  1. A communications system allowing you to communicate with your mover's principal place of business by telephone.
  2. A telephone number.
  3. A clear and concise statement about who must pay for complaint and inquiry telephone calls.
  4. A written or electronic record system for recording all inquiries and complaints received from you by any means of communication.

Your mover must give you a clear and concise written description of its procedure. You may want to be certain that the system is in place.

Do I have the right to inspect my mover's tariffs (schedules of charges) applicable to my move?

Federal law requires your mover to advise you of your right to inspect your mover's tariffs (its schedules of rates or charges) governing your shipment. Moving Companies' tariffs are made a part of the contract of carriage (bill of lading) between you and the mover. You may inspect the tariff at the mover's facility, or, upon request, the mover will furnish you a free copy of any tariff provision containing the mover's rates, rules, or charges governing your shipment.

Tariffs may include provisions limiting the mover's liability. This would generally be described in a section on declaring value on the bill of lading. A second tariff provision may set the periods for filing claims. This would generally be described in Section 6 on the reverse side of a bill of lading. A third tariff provision may reserve your mover's right to assess additional charges for additional services performed. For non-binding estimates, another tariff provision may base charges upon the exact weight of the goods transported. Your mover's tariff may contain other provisions that apply to your move. Ask your mover what they might be, and request a copy.

Must my mover have an arbitration program?

Your mover must have an arbitration program for your use in resolving disputes concerning loss or damage to your household goods. You have the right not to participate in the arbitration program. You may pursue court action under 49 U.S.C. 14706 to seek judicial remedies directly. Your mover must establish and maintain an arbitration program with the following 11 minimum elements:

  1. The arbitration program offered to you must prevent your mover from having any special advantage because you live or work in a place distant from the mover's principal or other place of business.
  2. Before your household goods are tendered for transport, your mover must provide notice to you of the availability of neutral arbitration, including the following three things:
    1. A summary of the arbitration procedure.
    2. Any applicable costs.
    3. A disclosure of the legal effects of electing to use arbitration.
  3. Upon your request, your mover must provide information and forms it considers necessary for initiating an action to resolve a dispute under arbitration.
  4. Each person authorized to arbitrate must be independent of the parties to the dispute and capable of resolving such disputes fairly and expeditiously. Your mover must ensure the arbitrator is authorized and able to obtain from you or your mover any material or relevant information to carry out a fair and expeditious decision-making process.
  5. You must not be required to pay more than one-half of the arbitration's cost. The arbitrator may determine the percentage of payment of the costs for each party in the arbitration decision, but must not make you pay more than half.
  6. Your mover must not require you to agree to use arbitration before a dispute arises.
  7. You will be bound by arbitration for claims of $5,000 or less if you request arbitration.
  8. You will be bound by arbitration for claims of more than $5,000 only if you request arbitration and your mover agrees to it.
  9. If you and your mover both agree, the arbitrator may provide for an oral presentation of a dispute by a party or representative of a party.
  10. The arbitrator must render a decision within 60 days of receipt of written notification of the dispute, and a decision by an arbitrator may include any remedies appropriate under the circumstances.
  11. The 60-day period may be extended for a reasonable period if you fail, or your mover fails, to provide information in a timely manner.

Your mover must produce and distribute a concise, easy-to-read, accurate summary of its arbitration program.

Must my mover inform me about my rights and responsibilities under Federal law?

Yes, your mover must inform you about your rights and responsibilities under Federal law. Your mover must produce and distribute this document. It should be in the general order and contain the text of appendix A to 49 CFR Part 375.

What other information must my mover provide me?

Before your mover executes an order for service for a shipment of household goods, your mover must furnish you with the following four documents:

  1. The contents of appendix A, "Your Rights and Responsibilities When You Move" - this pamphlet.
  2. A concise, easy-to-read, accurate summary of your mover's arbitration program.
  3. A notice of availability of the applicable sections of your mover's tariff for the estimate of charges, including an explanation that you may examine the tariff sections or have copies sent to you upon request.
  4. A concise, easy-to-read, accurate summary of your mover's customer complaint and inquiry handling procedures. Included in this summary must be the following two items:
    1. The main telephone number you may use to communicate with your mover.
    2. A clear and concise statement concerning who must pay for telephone calls.

Your mover may, at its discretion, provide additional information to you.

How must my mover collect charges?

Your mover must issue you an honest, truthful freight or expense bill for each shipment transported. Your mover's freight or expense bill must contain the following 19 items:

  1. Name of the consignor.
  2. Name of the consignees.
  3. Date of the shipment.
  4. Origin point.
  5. Destination points.
  6. Number of packages.
  7. Description of the freight.
  8. Weight of the freight (if applicable to the rating of the freight).
  9. The volume of the freight (if applicable to the rating of the freight).
  10. The measurement of the freight (if applicable to the rating of the freight).
  11. Exact rate(s) assessed.
  12. Disclosure of the actual rates, charges, and allowances for the transportation service, when your mover electronically presents or transmits freight or expense bills to you. These rates must be in accordance with the mover's applicable tariff.
  13. An indication of whether adjustments may apply to the bill.
  14. Total charges due and acceptable methods of payment.
  15. The nature and amount of any special service charges.
  16. The points where special services were rendered.
  17. Route of movement and name of each mover participating in the transportation.
  18. Transfer points where shipments moved.
  19. Address where you must pay or address of bill issuer's principal place of business.

Your mover must present its freight or expense bill to you within 15 days of the date of delivery of a shipment at its destination. The computation of time excludes Saturdays, Sundays, and Federal holidays. (Bills for charges exceeding 110 percent of a non-binding estimate, and for additional services requested or found necessary after the shipment is in transit, will be presented no sooner than 30 days after the date of delivery.)

If your mover lacks sufficient information to compute its charges, your mover must present its freight bill for payment within 15 days of the date when sufficient information does become available.

BINDING ESTIMATES Your mover may charge you for providing a binding estimate. The binding estimate must clearly describe the shipment and all services provided.

When you receive a binding estimate, you cannot be required to pay any more than the estimated amount at delivery. If you have requested the mover provide more services than those included in the estimate, the mover must not demand full payment for those added services at time of delivery. Instead, the mover must bill for those services later, as explained below. Such services might include destination charges that often are not known at origin (such as long carry charges, shuttle charges, or extra stair carry charges).

A binding estimate must be in writing, and a copy must be made available to you before you move.

If you agree to a binding estimate, you are responsible for paying the charges due by cash, certified check, money order, or cashier's check. The charges are due your mover at the time of delivery unless your mover agrees, before you move, to extend credit or to accept payment by a specific charge card such as American Express or a specific credit card such as Visa. If you are unable to pay at the time the shipment is delivered, the mover may place your shipment in storage at your expense until you pay the charges.

Other requirements of binding estimates include the following eight elements:

  1. Your mover must retain a copy of each binding estimate as an attachment to the bill of lading.
  2. Your mover must clearly indicate upon each binding estimate's face that the estimate is binding upon you and your mover. Each binding estimate must also clearly indicate on its face that the charges shown are the charges to be assessed for only those services specifically identified in the estimate.
  3. Your mover must clearly describe binding estimate shipments and all services to be provided.
  4. If, before loading your shipment, your mover believes you are tendering additional household goods or are requiring additional services not identified in the binding estimate, and you and your mover cannot reach an agreement, your mover may refuse to service the shipment. If your mover agrees to service the shipment, your mover must do one of the following three things:
    1. Reaffirm the binding estimate.
    2. Negotiate a revised written binding estimate listing the additional household goods or services.
    3. Add an attachment to the contract, in writing, stating you both will consider the original binding estimate as a non-binding estimate. You should read more below. This may seriously affect how much you may pay for the entire move.
  5. Once your mover loads your shipment, your mover's failure to execute a new binding estimate or to agree with you to treat the original estimate as a non-binding estimate signifies it has reaffirmed the original binding estimate. Your mover may not collect more than the amount of the original binding estimate, except as provided in the next two paragraphs.
  6. Your mover may believe additional services are necessary to properly service your shipment after your household goods are in transit. Your mover must inform you what the additional services are before performing them. Your mover must allow you at least one hour to determine whether you want the additional services performed. Such additional services include carrying your furniture up additional stairs or using an elevator. If these services do not appear on your mover's estimate, your mover must deliver your shipment and bill you later for the additional services.
    If you agree to pay for the additional services, your mover must execute a written attachment to be made an integral part of the bill of lading and have you sign the written attachment. This may be done through fax transmissions. You will be billed for the additional services 30 days following the date of delivery.
  7. If you add additional services after your household goods are in transit, you will be billed for the additional services but only be expected to pay the full amount of the binding estimate to receive delivery. Your mover must bill you for the balance of any remaining charges for these additional services no sooner than 30 days after delivery. For example, if your binding estimate shows total charges at delivery should be $1,000 but your actual charges at destination are $1,500, your mover must deliver the shipment upon payment of $1,000. The mover must bill you for the remaining $500 no sooner than 30 days after the date of delivery.
  8. Failure of your mover to relinquish possession of a shipment upon your offer to pay the binding estimate amount constitutes your mover's failure to transport a shipment with "reasonable dispatch" and subjects your mover to cargo delay claims pursuant to 49 CFR Part 370.

NON-BINDING ESTIMATES

Your mover is not permitted to charge you for giving a non-binding estimate.

A non-binding estimate is not a bid or contract. Your mover provides it to you to give you a general idea of the cost of the move, but it does not bind your mover to the estimated cost. You should expect the final cost to be more than the estimate. The actual cost will be in accordance with your mover's tariffs. Federal law requires your mover to collect the charges shown in its tariffs, regardless of what your mover writes in its non-binding estimates. That is why it is important to ask for copies of the applicable portions of the mover's tariffs before deciding on a mover. The charges contained in Moving Companies' tariffs are essentially the same for the same weight shipment moving the same distance. If you obtain different non-binding estimates from different Moving Companies, you must pay only the amount specified in your mover's tariff. Therefore, a non-binding estimate may have no effect on the amount that you will ultimately have to pay.

You must be prepared to pay 10 percent more than the estimated amount at the time of delivery. Every collect-on-delivery shipper must have available 110 percent of the estimate at the time of delivery. If you order additional services from your mover after your goods are in transit, the mover will then bill you 30 days after delivery for any remaining charges.

Non-binding estimates must be in writing and clearly describe the shipment and all services provided. Any time a mover provides such an estimate, the amount of the charges estimated must be on the order for service and bill of lading related to your shipment. When you are given a non-binding estimate, do not sign or accept the order for service or bill of lading unless the mover enters the amount estimated on each form it prepares.

Other requirements of non-binding estimates include the following ten elements:

    Moving Resources |Moving Quote | Apartment Mover - PA Movers.com
    Moving Companies - Moving Servicesers by PAmovers.com
    ServiceMagic, Inc.

    Moving Resources Everything you must know before you Move

    The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration's (FMCSA) regulations protect consumers on interstate moves and define the rights and responsibilities of consumers and household goods carriers.

    The household goods carrier (mover) gave you this booklet to provide information about your rights and responsibilities as an individual shipper of household goods. Your primary responsibility is to select a reputable household goods carrier, ensure that you understand the terms and conditions of the contract, and understand and pursue the remedies that are available to you in case problems arise. You should talk to your mover if you have further questions. The mover will also furnish you with additional written information describing its procedure for handling your questions and complaints. The additional written information will include a telephone number you can call to obtain additional information about your move.

    WHAT ARE THE MOST IMPORTANT POINTS I SHOULD REMEMBER FROM THIS PAMPHLET?

    1. Moving Companies must give written estimates.
    2. Moving Companies may give binding estimates.
    3. Non-binding estimates are not always accurate; actual charges may exceed the estimate.
    4. If your mover provides you (or someone representing you) with any partially complete document for your signature, you should verify the document is as complete as possible before signing it. Make sure the document contains all relevant shipping information, except the actual shipment weight and any other information necessary to determine the final charges for all services performed.
    5. You may request from your mover the availability of guaranteed pickup and delivery dates.
    6. Be sure you understand the mover's responsibility for loss or damage, and request an explanation of the difference between valuation and actual insurance.
    7. You have the right to be present each time your shipment is weighed.
    8. You may request a reweigh of your shipment.
    9. If you agree to move under a non-binding estimate, you should confirm with your mover - in writing - the method of payment at delivery as cash, certified check, cashier's check, money order, or credit card.
    10. Moving Companies must offer a dispute settlement program as an alternative means of settling loss or damage claims. ASK YOUR MOVER FOR DETAILS.
    11. You should ask the person you speak to whether he or she works for the actual mover or a household goods broker. A household goods broker only arranges for the transportation. A household goods broker must not represent itself as a mover. A household goods broker does not own trucks of its own. The broker is required to find an authorized mover to provide the transportation. You should know that a household goods broker generally has no authority to provide you an estimate on behalf of a specific mover. If a household goods broker provides you an estimate, it may not be binding on the actual mover and you may have to pay the actual charges the mover incurs. A household goods broker is not responsible for loss or damage.
    12. You may request complaint information about Moving Companies from the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration under the Freedom of Information Act. You may be assessed a fee to obtain this information. See 49 CFR Part 7 for the schedule of fees.
    13. You should seek estimates from at least three different Moving Companies. You should not disclose any information to the different Moving Companies about their competitors, as it may affect the accuracy of their estimates.

    STORAGE-IN-TRANSIT (SIT) - The temporary warehouse storage of your shipment pending further transportation, with or without notification to you. If you (or someone representing you) cannot accept delivery on the agreed-upon date or within the agreed-upon time period (for example, because your home is not quite ready to occupy), your mover may place your shipment into SIT without notifying you. In those circumstances, you will be responsible for the added charges for SIT service, as well as the warehouse handling and final delivery charges.

    However, your mover also may place your shipment into SIT if your mover was able to make delivery before the agreed-upon date (or before the first day of the agreed-upon delivery period), but you did not concur with early delivery. In those circumstances, your mover must notify you immediately of the SIT, and your mover is fully responsible for redelivery charges, handling charges, and storage charges.

    SURFACE TRANSPORTATION BOARD - An agency within the U.S. Department of Transportation that regulates household goods carrier tariffs, among other responsibilities. The Surface Transportation Board's address is 1925 K Street NW., Washington, DC 20423-0001 Tele. 202-565-1674.

    TARIFF - An issuance (in whole or in part) containing rates, rules, regulations, classifications, or other provisions. The Surface Transportation Board requires that a tariff contain three specific items. First, an accurate description of the services the mover offers to the public. Second, the specific applicable rates (or the basis for calculating the specific applicable rates) and service terms for services offered to the public. Third, the mover's tariff must be arranged in a way that allows you to determine the exact rate(s) and service terms applicable to your shipment.

    How must my mover handle complaints and inquiries?

    All Moving Companies are expected to respond promptly to complaints or inquiries from you, the customer. Should you have a complaint or question about your move, you should first attempt to obtain a satisfactory response from the mover's local agent, the sales representative who handled the arrangements for your move, or the driver assigned to your shipment.

    If for any reason you are unable to obtain a satisfactory response from one of these persons, you should then contact the mover's principal office. When you make such a call, be sure to have available your copies of all documents relating to your move. Particularly important is the number assigned to your shipment by your mover.

    Interstate Moving Companies are also required to offer neutral arbitration as a means of resolving consumer loss or damage disputes involving loss of or damage to household goods. Your mover is required to provide you with information regarding its arbitration program. You have the right to pursue court action under 49 U.S.C. 14706 to seek judicial redress directly rather than participate in your mover's arbitration program.

    All interstate moving companies are required to maintain a complaint and inquiry procedure to assist their customers. At the time you make the arrangements for your move, you should ask the mover's representative for a description of the mover's procedure, the telephone number to be used to contact the mover, and whether the mover will pay for such telephone calls. Your mover's procedure must include the following four things:

    1. A communications system allowing you to communicate with your mover's principal place of business by telephone.
    2. A telephone number.
    3. A clear and concise statement about who must pay for complaint and inquiry telephone calls.
    4. A written or electronic record system for recording all inquiries and complaints received from you by any means of communication.

    Your mover must give you a clear and concise written description of its procedure. You may want to be certain that the system is in place.

    Do I have the right to inspect my mover's tariffs (schedules of charges) applicable to my move?

    Federal law requires your mover to advise you of your right to inspect your mover's tariffs (its schedules of rates or charges) governing your shipment. Moving Companies' tariffs are made a part of the contract of carriage (bill of lading) between you and the mover. You may inspect the tariff at the mover's facility, or, upon request, the mover will furnish you a free copy of any tariff provision containing the mover's rates, rules, or charges governing your shipment.

    Tariffs may include provisions limiting the mover's liability. This would generally be described in a section on declaring value on the bill of lading. A second tariff provision may set the periods for filing claims. This would generally be described in Section 6 on the reverse side of a bill of lading. A third tariff provision may reserve your mover's right to assess additional charges for additional services performed. For non-binding estimates, another tariff provision may base charges upon the exact weight of the goods transported. Your mover's tariff may contain other provisions that apply to your move. Ask your mover what they might be, and request a copy.

    Must my mover have an arbitration program?

    Your mover must have an arbitration program for your use in resolving disputes concerning loss or damage to your household goods. You have the right not to participate in the arbitration program. You may pursue court action under 49 U.S.C. 14706 to seek judicial remedies directly. Your mover must establish and maintain an arbitration program with the following 11 minimum elements:

    1. The arbitration program offered to you must prevent your mover from having any special advantage because you live or work in a place distant from the mover's principal or other place of business.
    2. Before your household goods are tendered for transport, your mover must provide notice to you of the availability of neutral arbitration, including the following three things:
      1. A summary of the arbitration procedure.
      2. Any applicable costs.
      3. A disclosure of the legal effects of electing to use arbitration.
    3. Upon your request, your mover must provide information and forms it considers necessary for initiating an action to resolve a dispute under arbitration.
    4. Each person authorized to arbitrate must be independent of the parties to the dispute and capable of resolving such disputes fairly and expeditiously. Your mover must ensure the arbitrator is authorized and able to obtain from you or your mover any material or relevant information to carry out a fair and expeditious decision-making process.
    5. You must not be required to pay more than one-half of the arbitration's cost. The arbitrator may determine the percentage of payment of the costs for each party in the arbitration decision, but must not make you pay more than half.
    6. Your mover must not require you to agree to use arbitration before a dispute arises.
    7. You will be bound by arbitration for claims of $5,000 or less if you request arbitration.
    8. You will be bound by arbitration for claims of more than $5,000 only if you request arbitration and your mover agrees to it.
    9. If you and your mover both agree, the arbitrator may provide for an oral presentation of a dispute by a party or representative of a party.
    10. The arbitrator must render a decision within 60 days of receipt of written notification of the dispute, and a decision by an arbitrator may include any remedies appropriate under the circumstances.
    11. The 60-day period may be extended for a reasonable period if you fail, or your mover fails, to provide information in a timely manner.

    Your mover must produce and distribute a concise, easy-to-read, accurate summary of its arbitration program.

    Must my mover inform me about my rights and responsibilities under Federal law?

    Yes, your mover must inform you about your rights and responsibilities under Federal law. Your mover must produce and distribute this document. It should be in the general order and contain the text of appendix A to 49 CFR Part 375.

    What other information must my mover provide me?

    Before your mover executes an order for service for a shipment of household goods, your mover must furnish you with the following four documents:

    1. The contents of appendix A, "Your Rights and Responsibilities When You Move" - this pamphlet.
    2. A concise, easy-to-read, accurate summary of your mover's arbitration program.
    3. A notice of availability of the applicable sections of your mover's tariff for the estimate of charges, including an explanation that you may examine the tariff sections or have copies sent to you upon request.
    4. A concise, easy-to-read, accurate summary of your mover's customer complaint and inquiry handling procedures. Included in this summary must be the following two items:
      1. The main telephone number you may use to communicate with your mover.
      2. A clear and concise statement concerning who must pay for telephone calls.

    Your mover may, at its discretion, provide additional information to you.

    How must my mover collect charges?

    Your mover must issue you an honest, truthful freight or expense bill for each shipment transported. Your mover's freight or expense bill must contain the following 19 items:

    1. Name of the consignor.
    2. Name of the consignees.
    3. Date of the shipment.
    4. Origin point.
    5. Destination points.
    6. Number of packages.
    7. Description of the freight.
    8. Weight of the freight (if applicable to the rating of the freight).
    9. The volume of the freight (if applicable to the rating of the freight).
    10. The measurement of the freight (if applicable to the rating of the freight).
    11. Exact rate(s) assessed.
    12. Disclosure of the actual rates, charges, and allowances for the transportation service, when your mover electronically presents or transmits freight or expense bills to you. These rates must be in accordance with the mover's applicable tariff.
    13. An indication of whether adjustments may apply to the bill.
    14. Total charges due and acceptable methods of payment.
    15. The nature and amount of any special service charges.
    16. The points where special services were rendered.
    17. Route of movement and name of each mover participating in the transportation.
    18. Transfer points where shipments moved.
    19. Address where you must pay or address of bill issuer's principal place of business.

    Your mover must present its freight or expense bill to you within 15 days of the date of delivery of a shipment at its destination. The computation of time excludes Saturdays, Sundays, and Federal holidays. (Bills for charges exceeding 110 percent of a non-binding estimate, and for additional services requested or found necessary after the shipment is in transit, will be presented no sooner than 30 days after the date of delivery.)

    If your mover lacks sufficient information to compute its charges, your mover must present its freight bill for payment within 15 days of the date when sufficient information does become available.

    BINDING ESTIMATES Your mover may charge you for providing a binding estimate. The binding estimate must clearly describe the shipment and all services provided.

    When you receive a binding estimate, you cannot be required to pay any more than the estimated amount at delivery. If you have requested the mover provide more services than those included in the estimate, the mover must not demand full payment for those added services at time of delivery. Instead, the mover must bill for those services later, as explained below. Such services might include destination charges that often are not known at origin (such as long carry charges, shuttle charges, or extra stair carry charges).

    A binding estimate must be in writing, and a copy must be made available to you before you move.

    If you agree to a binding estimate, you are responsible for paying the charges due by cash, certified check, money order, or cashier's check. The charges are due your mover at the time of delivery unless your mover agrees, before you move, to extend credit or to accept payment by a specific charge card such as American Express or a specific credit card such as Visa. If you are unable to pay at the time the shipment is delivered, the mover may place your shipment in storage at your expense until you pay the charges.

    Other requirements of binding estimates include the following eight elements:

    1. Your mover must retain a copy of each binding estimate as an attachment to the bill of lading.
    2. Your mover must clearly indicate upon each binding estimate's face that the estimate is binding upon you and your mover. Each binding estimate must also clearly indicate on its face that the charges shown are the charges to be assessed for only those services specifically identified in the estimate.
    3. Your mover must clearly describe binding estimate shipments and all services to be provided.
    4. If, before loading your shipment, your mover believes you are tendering additional household goods or are requiring additional services not identified in the binding estimate, and you and your mover cannot reach an agreement, your mover may refuse to service the shipment. If your mover agrees to service the shipment, your mover must do one of the following three things:
      1. Reaffirm the binding estimate.
      2. Negotiate a revised written binding estimate listing the additional household goods or services.
      3. Add an attachment to the contract, in writing, stating you both will consider the original binding estimate as a non-binding estimate. You should read more below. This may seriously affect how much you may pay for the entire move.
    5. Once your mover loads your shipment, your mover's failure to execute a new binding estimate or to agree with you to treat the original estimate as a non-binding estimate signifies it has reaffirmed the original binding estimate. Your mover may not collect more than the amount of the original binding estimate, except as provided in the next two paragraphs.
    6. Your mover may believe additional services are necessary to properly service your shipment after your household goods are in transit. Your mover must inform you what the additional services are before performing them. Your mover must allow you at least one hour to determine whether you want the additional services performed. Such additional services include carrying your furniture up additional stairs or using an elevator. If these services do not appear on your mover's estimate, your mover must deliver your shipment and bill you later for the additional services.
      If you agree to pay for the additional services, your mover must execute a written attachment to be made an integral part of the bill of lading and have you sign the written attachment. This may be done through fax transmissions. You will be billed for the additional services 30 days following the date of delivery.
    7. If you add additional services after your household goods are in transit, you will be billed for the additional services but only be expected to pay the full amount of the binding estimate to receive delivery. Your mover must bill you for the balance of any remaining charges for these additional services no sooner than 30 days after delivery. For example, if your binding estimate shows total charges at delivery should be $1,000 but your actual charges at destination are $1,500, your mover must deliver the shipment upon payment of $1,000. The mover must bill you for the remaining $500 no sooner than 30 days after the date of delivery.
    8. Failure of your mover to relinquish possession of a shipment upon your offer to pay the binding estimate amount constitutes your mover's failure to transport a shipment with "reasonable dispatch" and subjects your mover to cargo delay claims pursuant to 49 CFR Part 370.

    NON-BINDING ESTIMATES

    Your mover is not permitted to charge you for giving a non-binding estimate.

    A non-binding estimate is not a bid or contract. Your mover provides it to you to give you a general idea of the cost of the move, but it does not bind your mover to the estimated cost. You should expect the final cost to be more than the estimate. The actual cost will be in accordance with your mover's tariffs. Federal law requires your mover to collect the charges shown in its tariffs, regardless of what your mover writes in its non-binding estimates. That is why it is important to ask for copies of the applicable portions of the mover's tariffs before deciding on a mover. The charges contained in Moving Companies' tariffs are essentially the same for the same weight shipment moving the same distance. If you obtain different non-binding estimates from different Moving Companies, you must pay only the amount specified in your mover's tariff. Therefore, a non-binding estimate may have no effect on the amount that you will ultimately have to pay.

    You must be prepared to pay 10 percent more than the estimated amount at the time of delivery. Every collect-on-delivery shipper must have available 110 percent of the estimate at the time of delivery. If you order additional services from your mover after your goods are in transit, the mover will then bill you 30 days after delivery for any remaining charges.

    Non-binding estimates must be in writing and clearly describe the shipment and all services provided. Any time a mover provides such an estimate, the amount of the charges estimated must be on the order for service and bill of lading related to your shipment. When you are given a non-binding estimate, do not sign or accept the order for service or bill of lading unless the mover enters the amount estimated on each form it prepares.

    Other requirements of non-binding estimates include the following ten elements:

    1. Your mover must provide reasonably accurate non binding estimates based upon the estimated weight of the shipment and services required.
    2. Your mover must explain to you that all charges on shipments moved under non binding estimates will be those appearing in your mover's tariffs applicable to the transportation. If your mover provides a non-binding estimate of approximate costs, your mover is not bound by such an estimate.
    3. Your mover must furnish non binding estimates without charge and in writing to you.
    4. Your mover must retain a copy of each non-binding estimate as an attachment to the bill of lading.
    5. Your mover must clearly indicate on the face of a non-binding estimate that the estimate is not binding upon your mover and the charges shown are the approximate charges to be assessed for the services identified in the estimate.
    6. Your mover must clearly describe on the face of a non binding estimate the entire shipment and all services to be provided.
    7. If, before loading your shipment, your mover believes you are tendering additional household goods or requiring additional services not identified in the non-binding estimate, and you and your mover cannot reach an agreement, your mover may refuse to service the shipment. If your mover agrees to service the shipment, your mover must do one of the following two things:
      1. Reaffirm the non-binding estimate.
      2. Negotiate a revised written non-binding estimate listing the additional household goods or services.
    8. Once your mover loads your shipment, your mover's failure to execute a new estimate signifies it has reaffirmed the original non-binding estimate. Your mover may not collect more than 110 percent of the amount of this estimate at destination.
    9. Your mover may believe additional services are necessary to properly service your shipment after your household goods are in transit. Your mover must inform you what the additional services are before performing them. Your mover must allow you at least one hour to determine whether you want the additional services performed. Such additional services include carrying your furniture up additional stairs or using an elevator. If these services do not appear on your mover's estimate, your mover must deliver your shipment and bill you later for the additional services.
      If you agree to pay for the additional services, your mover must execute a written attachment to be made an integral part of the bill of lading and have you sign the written attachment. This may be done through fax transmissions. You will be billed for the additional services after 30 days from delivery.
    10. If you add additional services after your household goods are in transit, you will be billed for the additional services. To receive delivery, however, you are required to pay no more than 110 percent of the non-binding estimate. At least 30 days after delivery, your mover must bill you for any remaining balance, including the additional services you requested. For example, if your non-binding estimate shows total charges at delivery should be $1,000 but your actual charges at destination are $1,500, your mover must deliver the shipment upon payment of $1,100. The mover must bill you for the remaining $400 no sooner than 30 days after the date of delivery.

    If your mover furnishes a non binding estimate, your mover must enter the estimated charges upon the order for service and upon the bill of lading.

    Your mover must retain a record of all estimates of charges for each move performed for at least one year from the date your mover made the estimate.

    What payment arrangements must my mover have in place to secure delivery of my household goods shipment?

    If your total bill is 110 percent or less of the non-binding estimate, the mover can require payment in full upon delivery. If the bill exceeds 110 percent of the non-binding estimate, your mover must relinquish possession of the shipment at the time of delivery upon payment of 110 percent of the estimated amount. Your mover should have specified its acceptable form of payment on the estimate, order for service, and bill of lading. Your mover's failure to relinquish possession of a shipment after you offer to pay 110 percent of the estimated charges constitutes its failure to transport the shipment with "reasonable dispatch" and subjects your mover to your cargo delay claims under 49 CFR Part 370.

    Your mover must bill for the payment of the balance of any remaining charges after 30 days from delivery.

    PART E - PICKUP OF MY SHIPMENT OF HOUSEHOLD GOODS

    Must my mover write up an order for service?

    We require your mover to prepare an order for service on every shipment transported for you. You are entitled to a copy of the order for service when your mover prepares it.

    The order for service is not a contract. Should you cancel or delay your move or if you decide not to use the mover, you should promptly cancel the order.

    If you or your mover change any agreed-upon dates for pickup or delivery of your shipment, or agree to any change in the non-binding estimate, your mover may prepare a written change to the order for service. The written change must be attached to the order for service.

    The order for service must contain the following 15 elements:

    1. Your mover's name and address and the USDOT number assigned to your mover.
    2. Your name, address and, if available, telephone number(s).
    3. The name, address, and telephone number of the delivering mover's office or agent at or nearest to the destination of your shipment.
    4. A telephone number where you may contact your mover or its designated agent.
    5. One of the following three dates and times:
      1. The agreed-upon pickup date and agreed delivery date of your move.
      2. The agreed-upon period(s) of the entire move.
      3. If your mover is transporting the shipment on a guaranteed service basis, the guaranteed dates or periods of time for pickup, transportation, and delivery. Your mover must enter any penalty or per diem requirements upon the agreement under this item.
    6. The names and addresses of any other motor carriers, when known, that will participate in interline transportation of the shipment.
    7. The form of payment your mover will honor at delivery. The payment information must be the same as was entered on the estimate.
    8. The terms and conditions for payment of the total charges, including notice of any minimum charges.
    9. The maximum amount your mover will demand at the time of delivery to obtain possession of the shipment, when transported on a collect-on-delivery basis.
    10. If not provided in the bill of lading, the Surface Transportation Board's required released rates valuation statement, and the charges, if any, for optional valuation coverage. The STB's required released rates may be increased annually by your mover based on the U.S. Department of Commerce's Cost of Living Adjustment.
    11. A complete description of any special or accessorial services ordered and minimum weight or volume charges applicable to the shipment.
    12. Any identification or registration number your mover assigns to the shipment.
    13. For non binding estimated charges, your mover's reasonably accurate estimate of the amount of the charges, the method of payment of total charges, and the maximum amount (110 percent of the non-binding estimate) your mover will demand at the time of delivery for you to obtain possession of the shipment.
    14. For binding estimated charges, the amount of charges your mover will demand based upon the binding estimate and the terms of payment under the estimate.
    15. An indication of whether you request notification of the charges before delivery. You must provide your mover with the telephone number(s) or address(es) where your mover will transmit such communications.

    You and your mover must sign the order for service. Your mover must provide a dated copy of the order for service to you at the time your mover signs the order. Your mover must provide you the opportunity to rescind the order for service without any penalty for a three-day period after you sign the order for service, if you scheduled the shipment to be loaded more than three days after you sign the order.

    Your mover should provide you with documents that are as complete as possible, and with all charges clearly identified. However, as a practical matter, your mover usually cannot give you a complete bill of lading before transporting your goods. This is both because the shipment cannot be weighed until it is in transit and because other charges for service, such as unpacking, storage-in-transit, and various destination charges, cannot be determined until the shipment reaches its destination.

    Therefore, your mover can require you to sign a partially complete bill of lading if it contains all relevant information except the actual shipment weight and any other information necessary to determine the final charges for all services provided. Signing the bill of lading allows you to choose the valuation option, request special services, and/or acknowledge the terms and conditions of released valuation.

    Your mover also may provide you, strictly for informational purposes, with blank or incomplete documents pertaining to the move.

    Before loading your shipment, and upon mutual agreement of both you and your mover, your mover may amend an order for service. Your mover must retain records of an order for service it transported for at least one year from the date your mover wrote the order.

    Your mover must inform you, before or at the time of loading, if the mover reasonably expects a special or accessorial service is necessary to transport a shipment safely. Your mover must refuse to accept the shipment when your mover reasonably expects a special or accessorial service is necessary to transport a shipment safely, but you refuse to purchase the special or accessorial service. Your mover must make a written note if you refuse any special or accessorial services that your mover reasonably expects to be necessary.

    Must my mover write up an inventory of the shipment?

    Yes. Your mover must prepare an inventory of your shipment before or at the time of loading. If your mover's driver fails to prepare an inventory, you should write a detailed inventory of your shipment listing any damage or unusual wear to any items. The purpose is to make a record of the existence and condition of each item.

    After completing the inventory, you should sign each page and ask the mover's driver to sign each page. Before you sign it, it is important you make sure that the inventory lists every item in the shipment and that the entries regarding the condition of each item are correct. You have the right to note any disagreement. If an item is missing or damaged when your mover delivers the shipment, your subsequent ability to dispute the items lost or damaged may depend upon your notations.

    You should retain a copy of the inventory. Your mover may keep the original if the driver prepared it. If your mover's driver completed an inventory, the mover must attach the complete inventory to the bill of lading as an integral part of the bill of lading.

    Must my mover write up a bill of lading?

    The bill of lading is the contract between you and the mover. The mover is required by law to prepare a bill of lading for every shipment it transports. The information on a bill of lading is required to be the same information shown on the order for service. The driver who loads your shipment must give you a copy of the bill of lading before or at the time of loading your furniture and other household goods.

    IT IS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO READ THE BILL OF LADING BEFORE YOU ACCEPT IT. It is your responsibility to understand the bill of lading before you sign it. If you do not agree with something on the bill of lading, do not sign it until you are satisfied it is correct.

    The bill of lading requires the mover to provide the service you have requested. You must pay the charges set forth in the bill of lading.

    THE BILL OF LADING IS AN IMPORTANT DOCUMENT. DO NOT LOSE OR MISPLACE YOUR COPY. Have it available until your shipment is delivered, all chargves are paid, and all claims, if any, are settled.

    A bill of lading must include the following 14 elements:

    1. Your mover's name and address, or the name and address of the motor carrier issuing the bill of lading.
    2. The names and addresses of any other motor carriers, when known, who will participate in the transportation of the shipment.
    3. The name, address, and telephone number of the office of the motor carrier you must contact in relation to the transportation of the shipment.
    4. The form of payment your mover will honor at delivery. The payment information must be the same that was entered on the estimate and order for service.
    5. When your mover transports your shipment under a collect-on-delivery basis, your name, address, and telephone number where the mover will notify you about the charges.
    6. For non-guaranteed service, the agreed-upon date or period of time for pickup of the shipment and the agreed-upon date or period of time for the delivery of the shipment. The agreed-upon dates or periods for pickup and delivery entered upon the bill of lading must conform to the agreed-upon dates or periods of time for pickup and delivery entered upon the order for service or a proper amendment to the order for service.
    7. For guaranteed service, the dates for pickup and delivery and any penalty or per diem entitlements due you under the agreement.
    8. The actual date of pickup.
    9. The identification number(s) of the vehicle(s) in which your mover loads your shipment.
    10. The terms and conditions for payment of the total charges including notice of any minimum charges.
    11. The maximum amount your mover will demand from you at the time of delivery for you to obtain possession of your shipment, when your mover transports under a collect-on-delivery basis.
    12. If not provided in the order for service, the Surface Transportation Board's required released rates valuation statement, and the charges, if any, for optional valuation coverage. The Board's required released rates may be increased annually by your mover based on the U.S. Department of Commerce's Cost of Living Adjustment.
    13. Evidence of any insurance coverage sold to or procured for you from an independent insurer, including the amount of the for such insurance.
    14. Each attachment to the bill of lading. Each attachment is an integral part of the bill of lading contract. If not provided to you elsewhere by the mover, the following three items must be added as attachments:
      1. The binding or non-binding estimate.
      2. The order for service.
      3. The inventory.

    A copy of the bill of lading must accompany your shipment at all times while in the possession of your mover or its agent(s). When your mover loads the shipment on a vehicle for transportation, the bill of lading must be in the possession of the driver responsible for the shipment. Your mover must retain bills of lading for shipments it transported for at least one year from the date your mover created the bill of lading.

    Should I reach an agreement with my mover about pickup and delivery times?

    You and your mover should reach an agreement for pickup and delivery times. It is your responsibility to determine on what date, or between what dates, you need to have the shipment picked up and on what date, or between what dates, you require delivery. It is your mover's responsibility to tell you if it can provide service on or between those dates, or, if not, on what other dates it can provide the service.

    In the process of reaching an agreement with your mover, you may find it necessary to alter your moving and travel plans if no mover can provide service on the specific dates you desire.

    Do not agree to have your shipment picked up or delivered "as soon as possible." The dates or periods you and your mover agree upon should be definite.

    Once an agreement is reached, your mover must enter those dates upon the order for service and the bill of lading.

    Once your goods are loaded, your mover is contractually bound to provide the service described in the bill of lading. Your mover's only defense for not providing the service on the dates called for is the defense of force majeure. This is a legal term. It means that when circumstances change, were not foreseen, and are beyond the control of your mover, preventing your mover from performing the service agreed to in the bill of lading, your mover is not responsible for damages resulting from its nonperformance.

    This may occur when you do not inform your mover of the exact delivery requirements. For example, because of restrictions trucks must follow at your new location, the mover may not be able to take its truck down the street of your residence and may need to shuttle the shipment using another type of vehicle.

    Must my mover determine the weight of my shipment?

    Generally, yes. If your mover transports your household goods on a non-binding estimate under the mover's tariffs based upon weight, your mover must determine the weight of the shipment. If your mover provided a binding estimate and has loaded your shipment without claiming you have added additional items or services, the weight of the shipment will not affect the charges you will pay. If your mover is transporting your shipment based upon the volume of the shipment - that is, a set number of cubic feet (or yards or meters) - the weight of the shipment likewise will not affect the charges you will pay.

    Your mover must determine the weight of your shipment before requesting you to pay for any charges dependent upon your shipment's weight.

    Most Moving Companies have a minimum weight or volume charge for transporting a shipment. Generally, the minimum is the charge for transporting a shipment of at least 3,000 pounds (1,362 kilograms).

    If your shipment appears to weigh less than the mover's minimum weight, your mover must advise you on the order for service of the minimum cost before transporting your shipment. Should your mover fail to advise you of the minimum charges and your shipment is less than the minimum weight, your mover must base your final charges upon the actual weight, not upon the minimum weight.

    How must my mover determine the weight of my shipment?

    Your mover must weigh your shipment upon a certified scale.

    The weight of your shipment must be obtained by using one of two methods.

    ORIGIN WEIGHING - Your mover may weigh your shipment in the city or area where it loads your shipment. If it elects this option, the driver must weigh the truck before coming to your residence. This is called the TARE WEIGHT. At the time of this first weighing, the truck may already be partially loaded with another shipment(s). This will not affect the weight of your shipment. The truck should also contain the pads, dollies, hand trucks, ramps, and other equipment normally used in the transportation of household goods shipments.

    After loading, the driver will weigh the truck again to obtain the loaded weight, called the GROSS WEIGHT. The net weight of your shipment is then obtained by subtracting the tare weight before loading from the gross weight.

    GROSS WEIGHT - TARE WEIGHT BEFORE LOADING = NET WEIGHT.

    DESTINATION WEIGHING (Also called BACK WEIGHING) - The mover is also permitted to determine the weight of your shipment at the destination after it delivers your load. Weighing your shipment at destination instead of at origin will not affect the accuracy of the shipment weight. THE MOST IMPORTANT DIFFERENCE IS THAT YOUR MOVER WILL NOT DETERMINE THE EXACT CHARGES ON YOUR SHIPMENT BEFORE IT IS UNLOADED.

    Destination weighing is done in reverse of origin weighing. After arriving in the city or area where you are moving, the driver will weigh the truck. Your shipment will still be on the truck. Your mover will determine the GROSS WEIGHT before coming to your new residence to unload. After unloading your shipment, the driver will again weigh the truck to obtain the TARE WEIGHT. The net weight of your shipment will then be obtained by subtracting the tare weight after delivery from the gross weight.

    GROSS WEIGHT - TARE WEIGHT AFTER DELIVERY= NET WEIGHT.

    At the time of both weighings, your mover's truck must have installed or loaded all pads, dollies, hand trucks, ramps, and other equipment required in the transportation of your shipment. The driver and other persons must be off the vehicle at the time of both weighings. The fuel tanks on the vehicle must be full at the time of each weighing. In lieu of this requirement, your mover must not add fuel between the two weighings when the tare weighing is the first weighing performed.

    Your mover may detach the trailer of a tractor trailer vehicle combination from the tractor and have the trailer weighed separately at each weighing provided the length of the scale platform is adequate to accommodate and support the entire trailer.

    Your mover may use an alternative method to weigh your shipment if it weighs 3,000 pounds (1,362 kilograms) or less. The only alternative method allowed is weighing the shipment upon a platform or warehouse certified scale before loading your shipment for transportation or after unloading.

    Your mover must use the net weight of shipments transported in large containers, such as ocean or railroad containers. Your mover will calculate the difference between the tare weight of the container (including all pads, blocking and bracing used in the transportation of your shipment) and the gross weight of the container with your shipment loaded in the container.

    You have the right, and your mover must inform you of your right, to observe all weighings of your shipment. Your mover must tell you where and when each weighing will occur. Your mover must give you a reasonable opportunity to be present to observe the weighings.

    You may waive your right to observe any weighing or reweighing. This does not affect any of your other rights under Federal law.

    Your mover may request you waive your right to have a shipment weighed upon a certified scale. Your mover may want to weigh the shipment upon a trailer's on-board, noncertified scale. You should demand your right to have a certified scale used. The use of a noncertified scale may cause you to pay a higher final bill for your move, if the noncertified scale does not accurately weigh your shipment. Remember that certified scales are inspected and approved for accuracy by a government inspection or licensing agency. Noncertified scales are not inspected and approved for accuracy by a government inspection or licensing agency.

    Your mover must obtain a separate weight ticket for each weighing. The weigh master must sign each weight ticket. Each weight ticket must contain the following six items:

    1. The complete name and location of the scale.
    2. The date of each weighing.
    3. Identification of the weight entries as being the tare, gross, or net weights.
    4. The company or mover identification of the vehicle.
    5. Your last name as it appears on the Bill of Lading.
    6. Your mover's shipment registration or Bill of Lading number.

    Your mover must retain the original weight ticket or tickets relating to the determination of the weight of your shipment as part of its file on your shipment.

    When both weighings are performed on the same scale, one weight ticket may be used to record both weighings.

    Your mover must present all freight bills with true copies of all weight tickets. If your mover does not present its freight bill with all weight tickets, your mover is in violation of Federal law.

    Before the driver actually begins unloading your shipment weighed at origin and after your mover informs you of the billing weight and total charges, you have the right to demand a reweigh of your shipment. If you believe the weight is not accurate, you have the right to request your mover reweigh your shipment before unloading.

    You have the right, and your mover must inform you of your right, to observe all reweighings of your shipment. Your mover must tell you where and when each reweighing will occur. Your mover must give you a reasonable opportunity to be present to observe the reweighings.

    You may waive your right to observe any reweighing; however, you must waive that right in writing. You may send the written waiver via fax or e-mail, as well as by overnight courier or certified mail, return receipt requested.

    This does not affect any of your other rights under Federal law.

    Your mover is prohibited from charging you for the reweighing. If the weight of your shipment at the time of the reweigh is different from the weight determined at origin, your mover must recompute the charges based upon the reweigh weight.

    Before requesting a reweigh, you may find it to your advantage to estimate the weight of your shipment using the following three-step method:

    1. Count the number of items in your shipment. Usually there will be either 30 or 40 items listed on each page of the inventory. For example, if there are 30 items per page and your inventory consists of four complete pages and a fifth page with 15 items listed, the total number of items will be 135. If an automobile is listed on the inventory, do not include this item in the count of the total items.
    2. Subtract the weight of any automobile included in your shipment from the total weight of the shipment. If the automobile was not weighed separately, its weight can be found on its title or license receipt.
    3. Divide the number of items in your shipment into the weight. If the average weight resulting from this exercise ranges between 35 and 45 pounds (16 and 20 kilograms) per article, it is unlikely a reweigh will prove beneficial to you. In fact, it could result in your paying higher charges.

    Experience has shown that the average shipment of household goods will weigh about 40 pounds (18 kilograms) per item. If a shipment contains a large number of heavy items, such as cartons of books, boxes of tools or heavier than average furniture, the average weight per item may be 45 pounds or more (20 kilograms or more).

    What must my mover do if I want to know the actual weight or charges for my shipment before delivery?

    If you request notification of the actual weight or volume and charges upon your shipment, your mover must comply with your request if it is moving your goods on a collect-on-delivery basis. This requirement is conditioned upon your supplying your mover with an address or telephone number where you will receive the communication. Your mover must make its notification by telephone; fax transmissions; e-mail; overnight courier; certified mail, return receipt requested; or in person.

    You must receive the mover's notification at least one full 24-hour day before its scheduled delivery, excluding Saturdays, Sundays, and Federal holidays.

    Your mover may disregard this 24-hour notification requirement on shipments subject to one of the following three things:

    1. Back weigh (when your mover weighs your shipment at its destination).
    2. Pickup and delivery encompassing two consecutive weekdays, if you agree.
    3. Maximum payment amounts at time of delivery of 110 percent of the estimated charges, if you agree.

    PART F - TRANSPORTATION OF MY SHIPMENT

    Must my mover transport the shipment in a timely manner?

    Yes, your mover must transport your household goods in a timely manner. This is also known as "reasonable dispatch service." Your mover must provide reasonable dispatch service to you, except for transportation on the basis of guaranteed delivery dates.

    When your mover is unable to perform either the pickup or delivery of your shipment on the dates or during the periods of time specified in the order for service, your mover must notify you of the delay, at the mover's expense. As soon as the delay becomes apparent to your mover, it must give you notification it will be unable to provide the service specified in the terms of the order for service. Your mover may notify you of the delay in any of the following ways: by telephone; fax transmissions; e-mail; overnight courier; certified mail, return receipt requested; or in person.

    When your mover notifies you of a delay, it also must advise you of the dates or periods of time it may be able to pick up and/or deliver the shipment. Your mover must consider your needs in its advisement.

    Your mover must prepare a written record of the date, time, and manner of its notification. Your mover must prepare a written record of its amended date or period for delivery. Your mover must retain these records as a part of its file on your shipment. The retention period is one year from the date of notification. Your mover must furnish a copy of the notification to you either by first class mail or in person, if you request a copy of the notice.

    Your mover must tender your shipment for delivery on the agreed=upon delivery date or within the period specified on the bill of lading. Upon your request or concurrence, your mover may deliver your shipment on another day.

    The establishment of a delayed pickup or delivery date does not relieve your mover from liability for damages resulting from your mover's failure to provide service as agreed. However, when your mover notifies you of alternate delivery dates, it is your responsibility to be available to accept delivery on the dates specified. If you are not available and are not willing to accept delivery, your mover has the right to place your shipment in storage at your expense or hold the shipment on its truck and assess additional charges.

    If after the pickup of your shipment, you request your mover to change the delivery date, most Moving Companies will agree to do so provided your request will not result in unreasonable delay to its equipment or interfere with another customer's move. However, your mover is under no obligation to consent to amended delivery dates. Your mover has the right to place your shipment in storage at your expense if you are unwilling or unable to accept delivery on the date agreed to in the bill of lading.

    If your mover fails to pick up and deliver your shipment on the date entered on the bill of lading and you have expenses you otherwise would not have had, you may be able to recover those expenses from your mover. This is what is called an inconvenience or delay claim. Should your mover refuse to honor such a claim and you continue to believe you are entitled to be paid damages, you may take your mover to court under 49 U.S.C. 14706. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) has no authority to order your mover to pay such claims.

    While we hope your mover delivers your shipment in a timely manner, you should consider the possibility your shipment may be delayed, and find out what payment you can expect if a mover delays service through its own fault, before you agree with the mover to transport your shipment.

    What must my mover do if it is able to deliver my shipment more than 24 hours before I am able to accept delivery?

    At your mover's discretion, it may place your shipment in storage. This will be under its own account and at its own expense in a warehouse located in proximity to the destination of your shipment. Your mover may do this if you fail to request or concur with an early delivery date, and your mover is able to deliver your shipment more than 24 hours before your specified date or the first day of your specified period.

    If your mover exercises this option, your mover must immediately notify you of the name and address of the warehouse where your mover places your shipment. Your mover must make and keep a record of its notification as a part of its shipment records. Your mover has full responsibility for the shipment under the terms and conditions of the bill of lading. Your mover is responsible for the charges for redelivery, handling, and storage until it makes final delivery. Your mover may limit its responsibility to the agreed-upon delivery date or the first day of the period of delivery as specified in the bill of lading.

    What must my mover do for me when I store household goods in transit?

    If you request your mover to hold your household goods in storage in transit and the storage period is about to expire, your mover must notify you, in writing, about the four following items:

    1. The date when storage-in-transit will convert to permanent storage.
    2. The existence of a nine-month period after the date of conversion to permanent storage, during which you may file claims against your mover for loss or damage occurring to your goods while in transit or during the storage-in-transit period.
    3. Your mover's liability will end.
    4. Your property will be subject to the rules, regulations, and charges of the warehouseman.

    Your mover must make this notification at least 10 days before the expiration date of one of the following two periods of time:

    1. The specified period of time when your mover is to hold your goods in storage.
    2. The maximum period of time provided in its tariff for storage in transit.

    Your mover must notify you by facsimile transmission; overnight courier; e-mail; or certified mail, return receipt requested.

    If your mover holds your household goods in storage-in-transit for less than 10 days, your mover must notify you, one day before the storage-in-transit period expires, of the same information specified above.

    Your mover must maintain a record of all notifications to you as part of the records of your shipment. Under the applicable tariff provisions regarding storage-in-transit, your mover's failure or refusal to notify you will automatically extend your mover's liability until the end of the day following the date when your mover actually gives you notice.